Camping Gear Reviews

We take a look at all the latest gear available for both beginner and experienced campers. There is something here to suit everybody. If you have a favourite item you don’t leave home without then head over to our contact form and send us a mail so we can check it out.

bear grylls survival hatchet

Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet Review And Opinions

Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet

Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet

Sometimes we come across a product that really catches our eye. The Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet from Gerber is one of those products.

Now you might think that having an axe out camping for the weekend is a bit overkill because traditionally they are heavy, large cumbersome tools and that you can do just fine with a good quality camping or survival knife but this axe is quality.

First lets look at the high level features and then break it down into more detail.

    • It has a quality rubber handle that provides plenty of grip and two finger notches near the head so you can grip it tightly for carving jobs.
    • It is a full tang construction so will not let you down.
    • Comes with a slim nylon sheath complete with belt loops so its easy to carry around.
    • The Blade is 3.5 inches and overall it comes in at 9.45 in length.

 

We have used plenty of products from the Bear Grylls range and because they are made by Gerber you know you have quality in your hand.

More user reviews and pricing available here

bear grylls survival hatchetBear Grylls Survival Hatchet Construction

First up is the construction. It is made from a full tang construction design – all made from a single piece of steel.

Experts will always sway towards full tang because it is the strongest way to construct it. Think of all the survival knives out there – most top rated knives will be full tang.

You do not have any joints that could fail when you put it under a bit of pressure so the hatchet will stand up to tough jobs around the campsite or in the forest.

It is made from high carbon steel so will probably last longer than most of us.

It may be compact but really punches above its weight. Incidentally it weighs in at 1.4 pounds so is light enough to carry about but all business when you need to get stuck in to some chopping action.

It is right at home chopping up firewood to keep you warm or because of its razor sharp blade and quality design you can use it for more intricate jobs like carving up tent pegs or making yourself an emergency shelter.

Like every blade or tool you use around the campsite be careful. This hatchet, while small is still razor sharp so don’t leave it lying around for the kids to play with.

Design Features

Lets take a quick look at the handle first on our features list. Its super grippy rubber handle is perfect, even when wet. You get a good feel for the tool when using it but will cushion your hand when you are doing something heavy duty like chopping down a tree.

They even designed a flared end on the grip so no fear of it sliding out of your hand when swinging it about like a mad man.

As mentioned above it has finger cutouts near the head. This gives you much more control in your hand when you are working on more delicate operations like carving or whittling pegs.

You loop in your fingers and its like an extension of your hand – except with a razor sharp edge. You could nearly substitute it in for your knife in some cases because it really is that good.

The blade itself is razor sharp and because of the curved edge it is much easier to chop heavier items like logs without it getting jammed.

The back of the head has a cross-hatched hammer edge which is very handy from banging in pegs or even knocking a big of steak into shape if you want to go all caveman on the meat.

We mentioned the handle already but just to note that there is a handy lanyard hole in the end of the handle so you could run a bit of para-chord through it and hang it up out of the way. It does come with a mould resistant sheath that has handy belt loops.

This makes it very easy to transport it around. Just run it through your belt and off you go. Its light and compact so wont weigh you down.

gerber axe bear grylls

Gerber hatchet sheath

Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet Final Thoughts

Our overall rating of the Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet is five stars. It is lightweight but deadly effective and has so many use cases that we could write about them all day.

The best way to see how good it is would be to go out and buy one yourself. You will be glad you did. Its running at about $30 over on Amazon at the moment so go take a look.

Our final though on this: We love the Gerber range of knives, tools and pretty much everything they make and this Gerber mini hatchet is no exception. Word class technology meets rugged survival gear.

The next time you are in the market for some high quality camping or survival gear you should check them out first.

If you have used one of these hatchets in the past then please leave us a comment with your experiences. Feedback from the wild is what this website is all about.

We have our own opinions on the tools we use but are always ready to take on board the findings of our readers.

Check out this great review video below

So thats our Bear Grylls Survival Hatchet review from Gerber. We hope you found it useful.

Thanks for stopping by Wildgetaway.com and see you out there someday.

kids daypack for camping

Kids Backpacks for camping

kids daypack for camping

Kids Backpacks for Camping

The great outdoors awaits. Getting outside with the kids is one of parenting’s great pleasures. Showing the kids your favourite trails, discovering new paths and parts of the world unknown. Getting away from the daily grind, seeing the natural world and bonding as a family is simply one of the best things a family can experience.

To do it safely, plan plan and plan some more. keep skills in mind when packing and don’t push too hard. Proper equipment is the key to a successful hike. A good rule is to plan on getting lost and having to spend a night on the trail. By having enough supplies in each person’s pack to allow for that, a family of hikers will come out with a great story instead of a tragedy.

When choosing equipment, go for the brightly coloured items. Dropping a dark coloured tool on the forest floor in fading light usually means that tool is gone until morning (if it’s ever found again). Wrap EVERYTHING in duct tape and paracord. Both duct tape and paracord are indispensable tools when getting stuck for the night.

 

The Pack

A day pack needs to be properly sized to every child. Take them shopping and try on all the packs. The biggest mistake parents make is getting a pack too large for their child’s body. A large pack tends to accumulate extra ‘stuff’ and become heavier than you would otherwise want. Adjustable straps, padded waist belt and chest harness keep the pack properly adjusted and help distribute the weight. Here is one that has all the right features including outside pockets, external compression straps and ventilation. The more reflective material on the kids backpack the better.

 

Weather Gear

An extra hat for the sun, sunscreen, rain gear are all essential. Check the forecast before setting out and plan for the worst case. Each pack should have a bag large enough to cover it to keep contents dry. Commercially made pack covers like this one keep the contents dry. Get the right size for the pack. An orange garbage bag with slots cut in it for the straps, installed with the sealed end facing up will do the same job. In cold weather, add an extra pair of everything.

 

The Contents

A day pack should plan for an emergency overnight wherever you get stopped. The basic needs for spending a night in the woods can be found here, but shelter, fire, water and food are important things. Kids under 8 likely won’t know about lighting a fire. That’s the parents responsibility. Teaching kids to stay still, blow their whistle in groups of three and keep warm is far more likely to stick.

 

Warmth

Foil blankets (mylar sheets) are the pinnacle of outdoor warmth. Like these ones here, a foil blanket will keep anyone dry (keep the top open to allow for evaporation), insulated from the ground and waterproof. Their reflective surface makes finding a lost hiker easier. Lightweight, taking up almost no space, two or three of these should be in every pack (as well as your vehicle emergency kit).

For fall/spring hiking, consider adding a warm toque and a pair of mittens to the pack if overnight temperatures fall below 40ºF. Dry socks are a must regardless of the season.

Hand Warmers are great for keeping fingers and toes from becoming frostbitten. They stay warm for about 6 hours, so overnight requires two for each extremity.

 

Water

washing hands campingA water bottle that holds 20oz or so is a good size. While hydration packs are handy, they don’t allow the cleaning of contaminated water. A stainless steel water bottle can be suspended over a fire to boil water for drinking. A wide mouth bottle, such as this one will allow ice and snow to be added as well.

Pro tip: ice produces more water for less heat than snow and never ever underestimate the amount of water you should bring when you go for a hike or a wander off into the woods. You can do without many things for a period of time but water (clean drinking water) is essential and you must be prepared for the worst.

Food

mountain house beefGranola bars, nuts, jerky, dried fruits are all good to have on the trail. Plan for snacks, and one full meal more than the intended hike duration. Dehydrated meals such as these from Mountain House provide a warm, nutritious meal without much preparation.

They do, however, require boiling water. Not a bad idea to keep one on hand in case of an unexpected overnight. As always be prepared and make sure you have the essential with you at all times – no matter where you go. You never know when things could take a turn for the worse.

It is no harm to stick a few of these into your pack before you head out anyway. They weigh little or nothing but could be vital in times of crisis to give you a much needed energy boost.

 

First Aid

A small first aid kit makes the hike more pleasurable. Blisters can be prevented with a little duct tape over the hot-spot to stop the friction. Bandages (bandaids) of various sizes, alcohol swabs and a couple of triangular bandages will address the common injuries. 5 years old is a good time to start talking about first aid measures.

 

Rescue

When hiking with kids, most families won’t go into uncharted territory. Know your area. In most cases, a lost hiker will be stumbled upon by other hikers accidentally. To increase the odds of that happening, have a plan. It is generally accepted that groups of three signals mean ‘help’. Three whistle blasts, three fires, three shots from a firearm (mostly pertaining to hunters) mean that someone needs help. A whistle is absolutely essential safety equipment, no matter where the trail takes you. The Fox 40 Classic classic is the gold-standard of emergency whistles. Its piercing tone can be heard for miles, over just about any other sounds and with no moving parts it’s unlikely to fail. Anyone can use the Fox 40 without over-blowing it.

Light sticks are another great way to be seen at night. A couple of these strung from a tree or hiking stick make a lost hiker easily visible.

 

The most important thing to do when lost is to stop. Stay still and get help. Teaching this to kids, and teaching them to use the equipment in their packs is the most important. Test all the gear in the backyard, run through the what-if scenarios.

 

Tailor each child’s pack to them. An avid hiker that knows how to use a map and compass should have both in their kits. a diabetic should have extra insulin and the right kinds of food. Winter hiking should have more food planned as the travel is harder through snow.

quad lantern coleman

Tent Lighting Rated and Reviewed

Tent Lighting Rated and Reviewed

When I was young and camping with my parents there was no such things as proper tent lighting to be honest. We did have an old lantern style thing that had two batteries the size of a house, that would last for a couple of nights if you were lucky.  There was light off the campfire if you were old enough to stay up late and sit by it. But once you went to bed that was it. Pitch dark with only the light of the moon to comfort you. As a small child I have very fond memories of this but I’ll be honest and say I was a bit terrified at times by the darkness.

Things have come a long way since then and in todays modern world there are is a whole range of camping and tent lights available for you to choose from. What we wanted to try and do with this post was look at some of the features (both good and bad) of some of the most popular ones so you can make an informed decision next time you go buy lighting for your tent.

Lets take a look at some camping and tent lanterns to get the review started

Coleman MicroPacker LED Mini Lantern

Coleman MicroPacker Review

The Coleman MicroPacker LED Mini Lantern review is first up and let me tell you this is superb.

Its multifunctional from the point of view that it is both a camping lantern and a flashlight. It only weighs 6 ounces even when the batteries are installed. Speaking of batteries, the light will run for up to 15 hours with three AA batteries so cheap enough to run as well. The bulbs are ‘lifetime LEDS’ so you wont have to worry about changing them either.

You can change from normal to directional lighting mode by sliding up the reflector. A very handy feature if you need to head out of the tent in the night. Both lantern and flashlight in the same place. While it is small – important when packing your bag – it still gives off plenty of light. Great for hanging in the tent for reading.

The final point to make is that it is a Coleman so quality wise it is top notch.

camping lantern rayovac

Rayovac Sportsman – Rugged Quality

Next up we want to look at the Rayovac Sportsman 240 Lumen 3D LED Lantern.

The Rayovac Sportsman is a compact very bright handy lantern for both camping and home use. Easier to justify buying something and better for the environment if you can find more than one use for it.

It comes in at seven inches tall and puts out a startling 240 lumen in lighting so perfect for any camping trip or walk at night.

Also popular with emergency preppers because it is lightweight, durable and water resistant.

It has a built in green led that flashed every few seconds when the light is turned off so you don’t have to fumble around in the dark looking for it. It sports optimized beams and comes complete with a fold out rubber grip. You can pull out a hook from the bottom of the lantern and hang it upside down in your tent for full handsfree lighting.

This light may be small but do not let that put you off. It will give off enough light to fill a room or even better – a tent. Happy camping.

Coleman Quad LED Lantern

quad lantern colemanThe final tent lantern we want to cover is the Coleman Quad LED Lantern. This is very popular when you are camping with the kids because of its design.

When fully together the lantern runs of 8 D size batteries. This gives it a bit of weight but it has a solid sturdy handle so nothing to worry about there. It gives off a serious amount of light and is perfectly suited for camping.

Set it up while cooking or just in the tent for relaxing a reading and you are good to go. Despite all the LEDs it runs cold and safe to the touch.

You get about 75 hours running time when its all together which is unbelievable if you think about the light it gives off.

You can take all four panels off the light and use them individually. Its great that you can give each of the kids one when they go to bed, or when there is a toilet run. Each individual light has a handle on the top so its easy to carry.

best camping lightYou then just simply clip them back onto the base and you have a very bright and powerful camping lantern suitable for every need.

Each light will give you about one and a half hours of light, provided by a built-in rechargeable battery. We have used these for the kids coming back from kids camp in the evenings or at dusk when outside with their friends.

They give great comfort at night and saves you having to buy individual lights for each of the family.

All in all our favorite lantern style camping light.

The final thing I want to discuss here are batteries. Often overlooked when you are packing up for a long trip and its very hard to find a shop in the middle of a forest. I suggest you go for a set of rechargeable batteries and a good quality charger (likethis one.) The panasonic charger is first class and once charged the batteries will last for ages.


Why not leave us a comment and let us know what type of lighting you use when camping or do you have any thoughts or opinions on our selection. Remember it you guys and gals that are using this gear and we love feedback.

Thanks for stopping by and see you at the campsite some day soon.

hiking stick with LED

Hiking Sticks | The Good the bad and the Ugly

hiking stick with LEDHiking Sticks – what, why and how to use them.

Hiking staff, trekking poles, walking sticks. All have different uses, but serve a similar purpose. All add stability to your step and reduce strain on your knees.

All hiking assists have different methods of helping the hiker along. Read below to differentiate the types of assists and choose which works best for you.

Many hikers use different aids for different terrain and goals. Mountain trails have different needs from flat trails. Winter treks have different needs from summer hikes.

Hiking Staff

Every cub or scout will remember the hiking staff. About armpit high, usually cut from a fallen tree found along a hike, these staffs have been a mainstay for hundreds of years. Some are carved with inch marks, some had designs from each camp carved into them to become an owner’s story.

Make your own by finding a hardwood stick about half-wrist thick, about armpit to ground length (longer is okay, you can always cut it down) and as straight as possible. Some choose to wrap the handle end (whichever you decide) in leather lacing and leave a wrist loop. Back-splicing on the leather looks impressive. Some shape the ground-end into a point. Do so in fire by holding the end over coals and rotating. As the wood dries it will gradually come to a point and become hard. The hardened tip will add to longevity. Some enterprising outdoorsmen have even used plant dyes to colour their staffs. These are the most personal, almost romantic of the aids. There’s nothing mechanical about the homemade staff.

It is worth noting that there are manufactured staffs (like this one) that serve the same function, but not with the same fashion or nostalgia. For the traditional camper/hiker, the hiking staff is a go-to from days bygone.

The advantages of a hiking staff such as this are the strength and length. Two can be used to improvise a stretcher in the event of an injury. Two can be lashed together to make a drag-sled (learn about lashing and knots here). Long enough hiking staffs have been used as poles for emergency shelter repairs and lean-to frames. The uses are limited only by your needs and imagination.

The hiking staff is typically heavier than trekking poles or walking sticks. The staff also is less effective at cushioning knees than trekking poles. No other option can compare to its ability to support the weight of a hiker going up or down hills, nor its benefit when traversing water.

Trekking poles

trekking polesTrekking poles are a little shorter (just above navel height typically) and commercially made. Carbon fibre poles are lighter than aluminum, but both are quite lightweight. Most feature a hardened ground-end tip.

Some of the best trekking poles (like these ones from Kelty) offer a cushioning system, typically spring based, to reduce shock. This can come in very handy on a long trek or hike in the wilderness.

By walking with trekking poles, part of the weight of the upper body (and pack) is redistributed to the poles instead of all being carried by the legs. Trekking poles also serve to steady hikers across rough terrain, test the waters of a stream before crossing and rig up shelters.

Some trekking poles put features like compasses (learn how to use a compass here), thermometers and flashlights in the ends.

While these are handy additions, the quality and function of the pole and shock system should be paramount. Look for quality materials in the grips, and grips that fit the hand comfortably.

If planning a winter hike, test with gloves and boots on for proper height and grip sizes.

Walking sticks

Walking sticks and canes are often synonymous. Typically waist high or a little taller, the materials from which a walking stick can be made are virtually limitless. Many people use a walking stick in their daily lives to add balance and support to their travels. For the purposes of hiking, look for a walking stick with a hardened tip and shock absorbing properties like trekking poles. Wrist straps are always handy. Collapsible walking sticks take up less space in camp. Also like trekking poles, walking sticks often have accessories attached to them (like this one). Comfort and durability are the features to look for in a walking stick.

With both trekking poles and walking sticks, the cone (usually removable) at the bottom is for soft ground and snow. Keep those handy.

Tips on using a trekking pole, walking stick or hiking staff

Once you’ve chosen your preferred hiking aid, use it correctly. Sized properly, these tools will help keep your knees happy during a hike.

With a hiking staff, it should make contact with the ground between steps, and beside the rearmost foot. It acts almost as a come-along to propel you forward. by angling it slightly forward and pushing down on it with the step, the step requires less effort. When walking downhill, plant the stick in the ground before you and push it into the ground to slow your pace and provide stability.

Trekking poles should move with the opposing foot. The pole in the left hand moves with the right foot and the pole in the right hand moves with the left foot. This will help with balance and stability, the whole point of a hiking assist.

Descending should typically be done with the body sideways to the slope and bisecting the slope’s angle to reduce the drop with every step. This decreases the strain on joints and reduces the opportunity for a fall.

When crossing moving water, use your aid to test the stability of the bed in front of you. keep the aid (staff pole or stick) firmly planted downstream of your body and use it to balance. Test each step before moving and always have two points of contact with the bed (one foot and the pole or two feet). Lean up-stream and go slowly. Never rush through moving water.

The need for an emergency shelter is perhaps the best reason for a group to have hiking staffs with them. Two hiking staffs, some rope and an emergency blanket create a quick lean-to that will suffice for a night. (for more about what to keep in your pockets for a night in the woods, go here)

Bear Grylls Gerber Camping Knife

Best Bushcraft & Camping Knives

The Best Bushcraft And Camping Knives

A good bushcraft knife is a critical piece of kit for every avid camper and even the weekend warrior.  I don’t know whether it is because of the multitude of uses it has or because we can revert to cavemen when we have a good knife in our hands.  Either way no camping trip itinerary is complete without one.

Now I’m not going to be covering commando style huge knives in this post, more the tame utility style functional ones that are somewhat safer in the hands of normal Joe’s like myself.  Always remember safety first when there are kids with you so don’t leave it lying around where small hands can get hold of it.

Leatherman Wingman Multi Tool

My Leatherman – Great Camping Knife.

First up on my list is the trusty Leatherman Wingman Multi-Tool.  While not your typical camping or bushcraft knife it still has a place in my bag wherever I go purely because it can do almost every small job I need it to.

I have had one version or another of these for years and they have never failed me.  I have lost a few and thats the only reason I have ever needed to buy another one.

While there are many variations in the range of Leatherman knives I find this one the best value for a camping expedition or just using around the house for small everyday tasks.  I suppose thats the advantage of a knife like this. It has multiple uses so won’t stay locked away for only camping trips.

All in all a great intro or general purpose camping knife you should have with you on each trip.

Born To Survive In The Wild – I Wish

Next we want to look at something a bit more specialised for camping and bushcraft trips. I really love the Gerber brand and they have produced a series of knives linking up with Bear Grylls.  Now I know we all like to think we are extreme survivalists when we go camping but for the majority of us your knife will be used for cutting ropes, bushes and whittling up the odd tent peg if you run short.  While I have no doubt that this knife could be used in extreme survival scenarios I will be most likely using it for some of the things mentioned above and maybe cutting into a block of cheese to look cool in front of the kids – caveman style.

camping knife guideThis knife in particular comes highly recommended and at a great price point too.  You can pick it up on Amazon.com here for a bargain.  Last time I looked it had over 50% off list price with free shipping so definitely worth checking out.

Its nice and compact and folds up to fit in your pocket so you can carry it around with you all the time without looking like a commando.  One feature I really like is the grip.  Nice contours so you can keep a good hold of it when hacking away at something that well, needs to be hacked away.

My final though on this knife.  A great all rounder and at this price its something you should definitely consider for you next camping trip or venture out into the wild.

BlizeTec Rescue Knife – Now We’re Talking

The next knife we want to look at is so much more than just a knife.  The BlizeTec Rescue Survival Knife is a 5-in-1 tactical companion.  This knife comes with a nice little extras that are perfect for many camping and even emergency occasions. See our full review here

BlizeTec Survival KnifeFirst up it has a built in LED light. This feature in itself is great because if like me when camping you always carry your knife with you then you also now have a light at all times too.  Great feature if you are wandering back to the camp late and nightfall catches up on you before you reach your destination.

Another great feature is the built in Fire Starter made from magnesium Alloy. When out camping or in the wild you never want to be in a position where you cannot keep warm. You might be out on a ramble, misjudge the time and get caught away from your camp when it gets dark. If you can’t find you way back with the LED flashlight then you might have to hold up for the night in some temporary ‘accommodation’. A good fire starter is a must when in the wild and the one included in this survival knife setup is perfect for the job.

The blade itself is razor sharp and made from high grade materials so will always hold an edge. The knife while extremely functional is not too big either and will fold up and fit into your pocket so you can bring it along with you and not have it sticking out looking like some sort of commando.

There are other features on this knife that are ideal in an emergency situation so I suggest you check it out. As a camping knife you can’t go wrong and it offers so much more.

 So there you have it. Three great knives of varying styles that would be perfect for any camping or bushcraft adventure. There are hundreds to choose from and we could write about them all day. The focus here was to give you a flavour of what is available and why you might pick a certain type of camping knife. The is not an extreme survival knife review more of a great camping companion knife review.

If you have a preferred knife you won’t go camping without then let us which one and why. The more information we can get on here the better for our readers.

Knife Safety When Camping

Remember: Always take extra care when bringing a knife on a camping trip. Small hands and adventurous kids should not be allowed to handle these unless supervised and in a safe environment. Safety first at all times folks.

Keep you knife with you in your pocket when out and about camping. You never know when you might need it. Oh and if you see a wild animal approaching don’t go waving your knife around – it’s probably best to run, very fast in the other direction.

Hubba Hubba MSR Tent

Best Two Person Tents On The Market Today

Best Two Person Tents On The Market Today

When there are just the two of you going camping and hiking out in the wild a good tent is a must have. Think about it for a second, most of the time you will be trekking about in the mud and wet or dust and arid landscape so when it comes to bed time you want to at least have something you can rely on.  A good tent doesn’t have to weigh a lot, nor cost a small fortune, but invest wisely and you will have many a happy night camping out in the wild.

We have used and trialled many tents over the past number of years and today we are going to give you a run down on the best of the bunch and some of the new additions into the camping market for 2015.

Are you into lightweight camping? Click here for the best ultralight tents for camping

MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2 Person Tent

First up is the NX from MSR.  

The original version of this tent hit the market a few years back and has pretty much topped the best sellers list since day one.  

It is extremely light by design but has all the room a couple could need in a tent.

It was originally designed for backpackers and people who like to travel light. Weighing in at just shy of four pounds this tent is great when you are on the move. It packs up really well and fits nicely into most decent backpacks.

This is an easy to assemble tent and comes with all the features you expect from a brand like MSR.

Ultra Light Weight at 3 pound 7 ounces
Symmetrical pole geometry for more space and easy to set up free standing hub system complete with DAC featherlight poles.
2 large vestibules for gear storage – one each side of tent
Multitude of air vents to reduce condensation and increase air flow even when its raining.
Colour coded tabs on the rainfly to allow for quick simplistic setup

The MSR takes out top spot for a quality durable and lightweight two person tent that you should take with you on your next camping adventure.

Mountainsmith Morrison 2 Person 3 Season Tent

Guided by over thirty years of outdoor experience Mountainsmith has designed an award winning two person tent that is exceptional value for money.

This really is a great offering and comes with a raft of features even to the point of printing the setup instructions on the tent bag.

A brilliant yet cost effect tent suitable for any weather and every camping occasion.

A good all rounder two person tent full of features.  Some of the things we liked about this were the handy overhead storage areas, the footprint and the taped seams. Works great in the rain so no need to worry about getting wet.

Two door / Two vestibule layout
Three season, free standing tent
Tent fly ventilation windows
Bathtub floor construction
Detachable ceiling loft pocket
Clip-pole attachment for lighter weight and better breathability
Interior mesh storage pockets
Two person layout

The Mountainsmith Morrison 3 season tent takes out our best value tent for this review.  Quality and feature rich at an affordable price point.

Coleman Sundome 2-Person Tent

If you are a weekend car camper or love camping out in the wild during the summer the you can’t go wrong with the Coleman Sundome.

These tents are designed to be very easy to setup on your own because they use a continuous pole and sleeve/pin and ring system.

They are suitable if it does rain because of the WeatherTec system included in the design.

The best thing about this tent is the price.  We cannot find anything else this good for the same money.

We loved the adjustable Variflo airflow ventilation system – a feature you would normally see in a much more expensive tent and at 48 inches in height you have plenty of room to move about when inside.

WeatherTec System to keep you dry
Durable carry bag with separate storage bags for tents, poles, and stakes
Exceptional Price
Easy two-pole set-up with shock-corded poles
Pin and ring design with InstaClip attachments
Dome structure is easy to transport and simple to set up
Interior gear pocket and electrical access panel
Very easy to set up

The Coleman Sundome is by far the best value tent we can find given the long list of features and the outstanding price point.  A great all rounder that wont break the bank.